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PCRMC DDCI Joins Siteman Cancer Network

Phelps County Regional Medical Center and the hospital’s Delbert Day Cancer Institute have joined the Siteman Cancer Network to collaborate on efforts to reduce the impact of cancer in south-central Missouri through research, treatment and prevention.

The network is affiliated with Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Together, the institutions will provide access to cancer prevention and control strategies, and genomic and genetic testing. Patients also will have access to highly specialized treatments and technologies, including clinical trials at Siteman Cancer Center.

“Phelps County Regional Medical Center and the Delbert Day Cancer Institute are proud to partner with Siteman, a nationally recognized cancer center,” said Ed Clayton, CEO of the regional medical center. “This partnership will bring additional resources and care to cancer patients living in south-central Missouri.”

As a network member, Phelps County Regional Medical Center and the Delbert Day Cancer Institute will work with Siteman Cancer Center to assess cancer’s impact on south-central Missouri, develop a plan to lessen the overall burden, and measure results. Possibilities include a greater emphasis on reducing smoking rates and promoting cancer screenings and other healthy interventions.

Key components of the network affiliation include:

  •  Navigators to help patients coordinate access to highly specialized care for complex cases, including access to clinical trials, at Siteman Cancer Center.
  • Use of genomic and genetic testing to help identify personalized treatments based on the characteristics of a patient’s disease.
  • Development of a database that incorporates such information (with patients’ permission) to improve clinical care and patient outcomes.
  • Sharing of best practices to improve patient care. Examples include sharing details regarding how nurses and radiation therapists are trained to care for oncology patients, and implementing industry-approved guidelines for screenings, genetic counseling programs and post-treatment care.
  • Implementation of cancer prevention strategies, such as the use of interactive risk-assessment tools, e-books, videos and individual coaching.
  • Development of targeted interventions to reduce cancer risk and of evaluation tools to measure success.

The network’s efforts also are expected to increase the number of people screened for cancer, which should result in earlier detection and improved health outcomes.

“Siteman Cancer Center and Phelps County Regional Medical Center – through the Siteman Cancer Network – are committed to preventing cancer and transforming patient care in the communities we serve,” said Timothy J. Eberlein, MD, director of Siteman Cancer Center and the Bixby Professor of Surgery at Washington University School of Medicine. “Together, we’re working to build a healthier Missouri.”

Through this relationship, the physicians and patients of the Delbert Day Cancer Institute will have access to prevention, diagnosis and treatment resources available through Siteman Cancer Center, with care coordinated by both centers.

“The Delbert Day Cancer Institute was founded on the idea of offering patient-centered care,” Clayton said. “This partnership with Siteman is a natural extension of that initial goal.”

 

 

aster awards

PCRMC Wins 7 Aster Awards for Healthcare Marketing

The Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Marketing Department earned seven Aster Awards in an international competition that recognizes excellence in healthcare advertising and marketing efforts.

The three Gold Awards and four Silver Awards presented to PCRMC were for work done in 2017. Thousands of entries were received in the contest this year from across the United States and around the world. PCRMC’s entries were judged against entries from similar-sized organizations.

“It is such an honor to receive these awards. It is a good feeling to have our work recognized as among the best in the country,” says PCRMC Marketing Director Somer Overshon. “I am very proud of our marketing team.”

The PCRMC Marketing Department took home the prestigious awards in the areas of radio advertising, flyers, billboard design, special events, physician directories, calendars and newspaper advertising.

The PCRMC Marketing Department won Gold Awards (presented to the top 5% of entries in the nation) for the following:

  • Entry Name: PCRMC Services
    Category: Radio Series
  • Entry Name: Hat, Glove and Mitten Drive Flyer
    Category: Flyer
  • Entry Name: PCRMC Provider Directory
    Category: Physician Directory

The PCRMC Marketing Department won Silver Awards (presented to the top 12% of entries in the nation) for the following:

  • Entry Name: Phelps Air Open House
    Category: Special Events
  • Entry Name: 2017 CareChex Double Pane Billboard
    Category: Billboard Design
  • Entry Name: Baby Calendar
    Category: Calendar
  • Entry Name: Faces and Places
    Category: Newspaper Advertising

A panel of industry experts judged all entries. Judging criteria included creativity, layout and design, functionality, message effectiveness, production quality and overall appeal.

“The recognition received by the PCRMC Marketing Department is well-deserved,” says PCRMC Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Jason Shenefield. “The marketing team works hard to communicate our programs, services, events, providers and more to the community, and this recognition speaks to their success.”

PCRMC Chief Executive Officer Ed Clayton agreed. “The PCRMC Marketing Department is made up of talented and creative staff. Educating the public about healthcare is important, and they do a great job of spreading the word in the communities we serve,” Clayton says.

“The quality and creativity of the entries submitted seems to increase each year. The 2018 Aster Awards program brought together some of the best and most creative advertising in the world,” said Melinda Lucas, Aster Awards program coordinator.

Marketing Healthcare Today Magazine and Creative Images, Inc. host the Aster Awards.

During last year’s Aster Awards competition, the PCRMC Marketing Department won two Gold Awards and four Silver Awards.

For more information about the Aster Awards program, please visit www.asterawards.com/winners.

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PCRMC Diabetes Education Services Improve Quality of Life for Patients

Clay Howlett was a junior in high school when he was diagnosed with diabetes. He felt dehydrated and had lost weight, about 25 pounds. Initially, Clay went to his family doctor and then to a hospital, where he was given his first dose of insulin.

“I was told I couldn’t have any sugar,” Clay recalls. “I remember one time during ball practice, my blood sugar dropped really low.” Clay says he experienced other symptoms, such as being tired, breaking out in sweats and constantly feeling thirsty.

Since age 17, Clay has had type 1 diabetes, which occurs when a person’s body does not produce insulin, a hormone that helps move sugar, or glucose, into the body’s tissues, where cells use it as fuel. According to the American Diabetes Association, only 5% of people with diabetes have the type 1 form.

Before that time, Clay did not know many people with diabetes. A dispatcher who worked for his father had the disease. Clay later learned one of his great-grandparents had diabetes.

“My uncle, my dad’s brother, was diabetic, too. He had type 2 diabetes, (when a person’s body does not properly use insulin) but he controlled it with his diet,” Clay says.

In his senior year in high school, Clay wanted to learn as much as he could about the condition he had, so he wrote his term paper on diabetes that year.

Clay has what some people refer to as brittle diabetes, as his wife of 12 years Patty explains. Brittle diabetes causes a person’s blood sugar levels to spike or drop at rapid rates. “His blood sugar can drop really quickly,” Patty says. “For a time there, every hour, we weren’t sure what would happen next.”

During a visit to his mother in Springfield, Missouri, Clay’s blood sugar dropped to an extremely low rate, so he was taken by an ambulance to a local hospital.

When Clay returned home to Rolla, Patty encouraged him to visit his doctor, Bohdan Lebedowicz, MD, an internal medicine physician with the Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) Medical Group. Dr. Lebedowicz asked if Clay would be interested in PCRMC’s diabetes education services.

Both Clay and Patty say they felt they already knew a lot about diabetes but initially agreed to attend one session.

That same day as Clay’s appointment with Dr. Lebedowicz, the Howletts met with Pati Cox, MEd, BSN, RN, a diabetic nurse educator at PCRMC, who did glucagon teaching (an injection to help with low blood sugars when a person is unconscious) and discussed the diabetes education classes more in-depth with them.

“Pati said that PCRMC offered individualized classes catered to each patient,” Patty recalls, adding that Cox was able to work around her and Clay’s schedules. “Clay really connected with Pati.”

According to Clay, PCRMC’s diabetes education classes are thorough, and the diabetes educators encourage patients to become very involved in their own care. “They have given me a better quality of life,” he says.

Patty says she attended the classes, as well, because she wanted to learn more about diabetes to help her husband.

Besides an incident in Jefferson City in February of 2018 when he was given a different brand of insulin, Clay has had no major problems with extreme blood sugar levels since participating in PCRMC’s diabetes education classes.

Clay says because of his foot ulcers, he cannot exercise much, but he follows his doctor’s and diabetes nurse educators’ recommendations of having four carbohydrates and two proteins each day during his meals. Clay says he used to buy orange juice all of the time to help with his blood sugar levels, but now, he hardly drinks it.

“The classes are so easy to understand, and Pati is so positive about it,” Clay says. “It’s definitely been a life saver.”

PCRMC offers a free diabetes support group for diabetes patients, their family members, caregivers and anyone interested in finding out more about diabetes. The support group meets the first Saturday of the month, except for January, July and September, from 10 a.m. to noon at PCRMC.

The PCRMC Diabetes Outpatient Clinic offers services in Rolla and Waynesville. For more information about Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support services at PCRMC, talk to your primary care provider, call 573-458-7314 or visit pcrmc.com.

Amy Ross

Longtime PCRMC Nurse Shares Why She Loves Her Job

Nursing was not always the first career choice for Amy Ross, a nursing supervisor at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC). She originally wanted to be a dietitian.

Her college roommate was studying nursing, and when Ross learned of all the things her roommate was doing as a nurse, Ross decided to switch her major.

“I’m so glad I did,” says Ross, who has been a nurse since 1990. “There is nothing else I would rather do. There has never been one day that I regret making the decision to become a nurse.”

Ross first earned an associate’s degree and later went back to school to receive a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) at Drury University. Her Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) is from Central Methodist University. Ross also has a certificate in clinical nursing leadership.

In 1998, Ross joined the PCRMC nursing team. She began as a nurse in PCRMC’s operating rooms. She later transitioned to a nursing role in medical oncology and then became a nursing director in that department.

Ross now works in PCRMC’s Nursing Administration Office and has been in her current position as a nursing supervisor for about three years. Additionally, she works one day a week in PCRMC’s Patient Access Services Office, which helps patients transition between other facilities and PCRMC.

“I love this job,” Ross says. “I am constantly learning new things, and as a nursing supervisor, I get to interact with nurses in all units and on all floors.”

While she left for a short time to take a nursing job in the St. Louis area, Ross has been employed by PCRMC for most of her career.

“This is one of the best places to work. The employees really care about each other here, and the leadership is very supportive of the nursing staff. Nursing administrators at PCRMC are accessible, too.”

Nurses work in several different care settings, not just hospitals. There are nurses in the anesthesia units, doctors’ offices, homecare and hospice settings and other areas. Additionally, Ross says PCRMC nursing leaders can be accommodating to nurses’ schedules. PCRMC offers tuition reimbursement, which Ross utilized when pursuing her nursing degrees.

While Ross says nurses will likely experience hard days, overall, the job is worth it when those difficult times occur. “It’s a good feeling when patients and their families thank you for making a big impact on their lives,” she says. “Nurses really get to touch the lives of everyone.”

Outside of PCRMC, Ross likes to stay healthy and enjoys running, which she says is a stress reliever. She has been running for almost 30 years now. She started running about 2 to 3 miles at a time and has built up her stamina.

In April of 2018, Ross participated in the Boston Marathon. She completed the race with a time of 4 hours, 44 minutes.

“This was something that has been on my bucket list,” she says. It took her 6 years to train and qualify for the event. Despite running through the cold and rain during the marathon, Ross says it was an experience of a lifetime.

Ross encourages her fellow colleagues and patients to exercise. “It doesn’t have to be running. Just find an activity to do for about 30 minutes a day. It makes you feel much better,” she says.

Nurses spend a lot of their time giving of themselves to patients and their families during their jobs. Ross says it is important for nurses to take time for themselves, too.

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Join PCRMC in Celebrating National Nurses Week

Nurses at Phelps County Regional Medical Center (PCRMC) and around the country are being honored this week, as the American Nurses Association (ANA) celebrates National Nurses Week.

The theme for this year’s National Nurses Week is “Nurses Inspire, Innovate, Influence.” Nurses are advocates who help move healthcare forward.

During National Nurses Week, PCRMC leaders and staff would like to extend a special thanks to nurses, who provide the highest level of quality care in multiple specialty areas to patients of all ages. Nurses are valuable assets to the communities they serve.

“We appreciate our nurses every day, but National Nurses Week is a great opportunity to take the time to celebrate everything that nurses do,” says PCRMC Senior Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer Keri Brookshire-Heavin.

Nurses make up the highest number of hospital employees across Missouri, Brookshire-Heavin notes. “We couldn’t offer compassionate care without nurses,” she says. “Whether it is helping deliver a baby or holding the hand of a patient, nurses are hard-working and dedicated in their jobs every day.”

PCRMC Administrative Director of Patient Care Services Cindy Butler says nurses are often the first contact for patients in healthcare settings. “They are usually the most memorable people, too,” Butler says. “Patients remember how nurses made them feel better and how they cared for them.”

While being a nurse can be demanding at times, the interactions nurses have with their patients and peers make their jobs extremely rewarding.

PCRMC nurses deserve special recognition for their efforts in delivering exceptional care while also having an unfailing commitment to saving lives. In addition, they are dedicated to improving the health of countless patients. At PCRMC, nurses sacrifice numerous hours of their time to consistently deliver outstanding, personalized and patient-centered care.

National Nurses Week is observed each year beginning on May 6 and ending on May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Nightingale was known as the founder of modern nursing. During the Crimean War, she tended to soldiers and was called “The Lady with the Lamp” since she made her rounds at night.